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For the last few weeks I've been nutting out the pack routine and config for my upcoming solo ride from Brisbane to Melbourne. Today I tested the load on the road with great results. All the heavy stuff is fore, light is aft.
I like to keep packaging stuff in case it comes in handy. Sure enough, a wire-rimmed zip-up sheets packet is perfect for stowing my heavy wets under the front pack on the seat.

The biggest achievement however will be returning home after 3-4 weeks in the wild, able to sit down and get up again....
Nah.. not really the actual wild. Too old for sleeping on the ground anymore LOL 馃槣
 

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That looks scary to me. But I'm old and (now) rather abashed!.
And I thought I traveled bulky. Hats off, sir!
 

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When an old lady goes away for a few weeks, she likes to to ensure nothing is forgotten before she forgets 馃槀
 

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When an old lady goes away for a few weeks, she likes to to ensure nothing is forgotten before she forgets 馃槀
I can fully appreciate it m'lady. I see folk packing for two months in Cambodia - and they seem to pack less than I'd take for a trip to see my family in the UK.
 

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Wheelie machine..
More than that - I'd worry about "fishtailing". Crosswinds will be downright interesting too.
My last trip to the UK, there were a bunch of Spanish lads crossing over for the TT. One on a 390Duke with a a massive net about the size of that Ventura pack. He was already aware of issues in sidewinds.
 

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Yup, big gusts are scary.
Worst windy ride ride was down the middle of the southern end of South Island, NZ. Two-up, luggage, tent etc on a ZX7. I'd never been more terrified. We could see trees bowing ahead of us, knowing what was coming as we approached and braced for them. Coming from a pretty wild and woolly coastal area, I thought I knew what wind was until then. Perched on that high pillion seat was not my favoured position that day.
Windy weather in general isn't a drama tho.
 

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Yup, big gusts are scary.
Worst windy ride ride was down the middle of the southern end of South Island, NZ. Two-up, luggage, tent etc on a ZX7. I'd never been more terrified.
Ditto! In 2005, I was at the bottom of NZ's south island on a Honda Blackbird in a full gale with a large Ventura rear seat pack like yours and I honestly thought I might not live through it. The 790 is a surprisingly competent tourer. I did a 6 day tour last year before covid struck, travelling fairly light and it was just great. The light weight of the bike really reduces fatigue on a long haul.

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I'm glad you said the 790 is a competent tourer. I suspect I won't be experiencing the fatigue of pillioning a sportsbike (Takaka Hill ruined my wrists), or the pectoral nerve strain from the SV-S's clipons this time. 6 months of daily commutes in my new riding position bodes well for general body conditioning, although hours on end bum-numbing is still something to look forward to, of course. Then again, I'm a tough old bird when I have to be. There will be plenty of osteo-strength paracetamol and ibuprofen on board, as at home as normal.

Fuel economy looks good according to yesterday's test ride. (3.25 - 3.5 litres/100km) The bike handled beautifully fully loaded in town and country, and of course there's plenty of power.
There's nothing I can do about bulk or profile except strapping, but it all felt pretty good, knowing there will be the inevitable tweaks and modifications as I go.
 

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I'm glad you said the 790 is a competent tourer. I suspect I won't be experiencing the fatigue of pillioning a sportsbike (Takaka Hill ruined my wrists), or the pectoral nerve strain from the SV-S's clipons this time. 6 months of daily commutes in my new riding position bodes well for general body conditioning, although hours on end bum-numbing is still something to look forward to, of course. Then again, I'm a tough old bird when I have to be. There will be plenty of osteo-strength paracetamol and ibuprofen on board, as at home as normal.

Fuel economy looks good according to yesterday's test ride. (3.25 - 3.5 litres/100km) The bike handled beautifully fully loaded in town and country, and of course there's plenty of power.
There's nothing I can do about bulk or profile except strapping, but it all felt pretty good, knowing there will be the inevitable tweaks and modifications as I go.
Well, I'm 73 and don't get too stuffed on it so you should be fine :) . One thing you might want to check before you head off is your chain tension fully loaded. I can't say for certain that it was the root cause but towards the end of the first day on tour, I found that my chain was drum tight and had to back the tension off. There may have been a couple of other reasons because I didn't check it fully loaded with me on it before the trip. However, I just have a nagging feeling that the extra load may have contributed. A couple of clicks on the preload might have been an option. Anyway, have a great trip!
 

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Essie be careful. With that big sail on the back a sudden stiff cross wind could be a real handful.:rolleyes:

Have fun on your trip.

Cheers.
 

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Ditto! In 2005, I was at the bottom of NZ's south island on a Honda Blackbird in a full gale with a large Ventura rear seat pack like yours and I honestly thought I might not live through it. The 790 is a surprisingly competent tourer. I did a 6 day tour last year before covid struck, travelling fairly light and it was just great. The light weight of the bike really reduces fatigue on a long haul.

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Geoff - That info is appreciated. Crosswinds is what most worries me about the 790, especially on long trips.
I have yet to do any, but find the 790 moves about A LOT in crosswinds. Which is mentally fatiguing.
I am of course comparing it to my other current steed which is just a damn big block of metal - this has different challenges, but wind is not one of them.
 

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Crosswinds are my least favourite thing when riding. Rannoch Moor in the Scottish Highlands was the only place I have ever been scared on a bike on my way up to the west coast, which is my favourite place to ride. It's stunning. The crosswinds were pure evil.

Brisbane to Melbourne is quite a ride. Over 1,000 miles. I've driven the Sydney to Melbourne bit via Eden and Lakes Entrance, having already driven the reverse journey via the Great Ocean Road, Ballarat and the Blue Mountains. I'd love to do it one day but on my GS, not my 790 Duke.

Enjoy your trip and remember, we like pictures.
 

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Geoff - That info is appreciated. Crosswinds is what most worries me about the 790, especially on long trips.
I have yet to do any, but find the 790 moves about A LOT in crosswinds. Which is mentally fatiguing.
When I compare my Duke to my previous bike, Aprilia Dorsoduro 750, it a ***** cat in a crosswind.

The Dorso being very tall got pushed around by a crosswind in wicked fashion. Pretty sure taller bikes are more adversely affected by crosswinds than their shorter brethren. Tall gives the wind more leverage above the tire contact patch to make things more interesting.

First time I encountered a stiff crosswind on the 790 I was prepared for the worst, but was pleasantly surprised how well it behaved.

I remember a time on my Versys 650 while going thru a mountain pass on the freeway. There were gaps in the mountains that allowed for a brief encounter with a heavy crosswind. I had just launched from the hotel fairly early in the morning and was not expecting any wind. When I passed the first gap and hit the howling crosswind it immediately pushed me over into the next lane. Fortunately it was empty at the time.

The pics show the very spot. The cold morning air was flowing downhill from higher terrain following the path of least resistance thru the canyons until it crossed the freeway and colliding with an unsuspecting car or motorcycle. Definitely sufficient to spill your coffee.

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@Essie is reading this and thinking "What a punch of bussies"
Taking @Hawkerjet comments on height further - bodes not well for ADV's in crosswinds then!.
Sadly FF has never really caught on.
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Discussion Starter #17
giggles
Along with the kitchen sink, all is taken on board.
Sustained crosswinds can be fun. It freaks cagers out when they're following a bike on a continuous lean on a straight road and they tend to back off a bit. I enjoy those days.. Gusts not so much. My 'sail' is a concern of course. Not everyone can go weeks at a time with only one change of clothes. The temps will be cool, so the main bulk is layers and warm things like jacket and pants liners etc. The rear pack contains other essential items such as a CPAP machine, without which I wouldn't even have my license. There is scope for further compression of the rear pack, however, especially when I hit the cold weather proper at the second half of the adventure. All that stuff is back there. On my budget hotel soaps etc are not guaranteed, so I'm prepared for any situation along the way. I'm not stowing water, rather using a backpack bladder.
 

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So for newbies like me who have not experienced the sort of cross winds you guys refer too - what do you do in those situations? How do you 'manage' a cross wind? Do you counter steer into it and then straignten up as it eases off?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Basically yes. And it's fun.
Gusts keep you on your toes though. If you're lucky to be going in the right direction you can anticipate depending on what's visible ahead. Otherwise, reflexes are your friend LOL
 

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Hey gang, considering a 790/890/MT09SP, all of which only hold 3.7 gallons. So the smaller 790 must hold the range advantage. Can some of you please post what's a real-world range if riding spiritedly, but staying in the mid range, to conserve fuel as much as possible? Some of the places I ride have 130 miles between gas stations. I used to make it deep into the reserve on my MT-10 (with 4.5 gallons), which was a bit harrowing. Hope it's better with these bikes. Thx.
 
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