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I recently bought a TomTom Rider 550, and while the battery life looks to be good a 'connected' set up linked to the bike's ignition, was more appealing.

I’ve put this guide together for those of you who, like me may be ‘electrically challenged’. I’ve tried to include as much detail as possible which will hopefully remove any doubts and help you get it all done a bit quicker than I did.

Thanks to forum members @dma and @Geoff for their helpful posts and others like Chris Smith and Craig Carter on the Duke Facebook group.

Fig 1 _ Tools.jpg Fig 2 _ Headlight release.jpg Fig 3 _ Headlight exposed.jpg Fig 4 _ Headlight removed.jpg Fig 5 _ Plastic Cover removed.jpg Fig 6 _ ACC1 & ACC2 exposed.jpg Fig 7 _ TomTom cables connected.jpg Fig 8 _ Ignition Test On.jpg Fig 9 _ Ignition Test Off.jpg

As there is a limit on the amount of pics per post I have the balance in Part 2 below. The full text of the guide is included in this post.

First up tools etc

Fig 1 - has most of the key items laid out. Various hex and star tools for removing headlight assembly and plastic shrouds. Crimping tool and spade connectors for the cabling, tape, scissors, and the multi-meter to check positive and negative connectors on the bike (more detail later).

The crazy looking crimping tool in the top left of the pic isn’t necessary as you could crimp with some pliers but this has an amazing failsafe wire stripping capability and the added bonus of being red!

To prepare the 550’s cable you will need to strip the insulation off the ends of the cable (if not already done) and then use the crimping tool to clamp the metal of the male spade connectors to the exposed wire.

I doubled the wire over and twisted the ends to try and get a snug fit, but the wire is still quite thin so don’t be afraid to take this approach.

Once I’d made sure the connection was snug I placed some heat shrink tubing over the end of the connector and the wire and used a hair dryer to shrink it down and bond it all together. It did occur to me much later i.e. after I’d connected everything, that this might have been a good opportunity to shorten the overall TomTom cable length given that it only has to run about 30 to 40cm up to the bars rather than back to the battery, but I arrived at this conclusion much too late – it might help you though.

Anyway, with the cable prepared and positives and negatives clearly distinguishe it was time to move to the bike.

Access to connections & disassembly

Fig 2 - Obviously remove any screens etc first. Using one of the star hex undo the headlight bolt right at the top. Its captured so won’t fall out and bounce a way. A good tip from @dma is to count the number of turns on the way out so you can set the headlight back to its current alignment on the return journey.

Fig 3 - Once the bolt is released the headlight will hang forward supported by the two bolts at the bottom of the mounting.

Fig 4 – You could leave the headlight in place as others have done and work around it but as it was easy enough to remove completely by undoing the 2 bolts I mentioned earlier so I chose to get it out of the way and make access easier. This leaves removing the plastic cover as the next step. Two screws (star hex) at the bottom corners and one top centre. With these removed just get your fingers behind either side and pop the cover off. It’s not easy as its quite a snug fit. There are a couple of clips up behind the indicators holding the cover on which are quite firm, but it will pop off with a little effort.

Connections

Fig 5 – ACC1 & ACC2 are tucked up on the left (this is the “after” pic with everything back in place so don’t be misled by the way they look and the white tape).

Fig 6 – This is what they look like once they are freed from the wiring cluster. I can confirm that in my case ACC2 is the one linked to the ignition switch and preferable if you want the TomTom to turn on and off with the bike. This is where the multi-meter comes in. My ACC2 had 2 wires. One a dirty orange brown the other the same with a black stripe??? I didn’t want to risk frying my A$500 TomTom by connecting the wrong power source, so I used the multi-meter to check for positive and negative. If you don’t need this step or know what you’re doing jump to Fig 7 otherwise, some guidance is provided below.

Identifying positive & negative using multi meter.

With the ignition off use the multi meter to check each connector by pushing the probe onto the bare metal surface of the female spade connector. It should read zero ie no current flowing. Now turn the ignition on and repeat the process. Note: you will get a warning on the dash telling you the headlight is not operational. Ignore it this will resolve when you plug it all back in.

If you have the red probe on the positive connector and the black one on the negative connector the multi meter should read somewhere between 12.5 & 14 volts. If you have them arse about i.e. reverese polarity, the meter will say ‘minus’ 12.5 to 14 volts or negative. Reverse your probes to confirm that you have a ‘positive’ result and mark the connectors, so you know which is which.

Note: in Fig 1 I have left the probes in the correct inputs on the multi-meter. To measure the power set the dial to the first click i.e. V accompanied by a symbol using a straight line _ and …

While I was at it, I took the rear seat off and checked my battery also 12.7v. Tick.


Connection Testing

Fig 7 – Ok, the cable is now firmly connected, and I have also marked the positive connection with some silver race tape (left).

Fig 8 – With the cable now fed up to the bars and the 550 connection base and unit in place I turn on the ignition on and…… tah dah! Map time!

Note: you will get a warning on the dash telling you the headlight is not operational. Ignore it this will resolve when you plug it all back in.

Fig 9 – And, powers down when the ignition is turned off. Success.

Assuming your outcome is similar just reverse the steps above to re-assemble everything, remembering to count back the headlight bolt turns as the final step to ensure your alignment is retained.

Mounting

If you are using the OEM PP GPS bracket (as I am) this fits in the centre of the bar using the existing bar brackets. Alternatively, there is a bunch of RAM mount options supplied with the unit but these need to be positioned to the left or right as they extend too far out as a centre mount – for me anyway.

Fig 10 – shows the PP GPs bracket with the 550’s power connection already mounted (using the 4 screws and washers provided by TomTom). You’ll note that you can position the unit higher or lower on the mount depending on where you place the screws. Lower worked better for me in terms of the position of the GPS. You can test this by just sitting on the bike and holding the bracket in position with the GPS fitted before actually attaching.

In this position when I’m riding the 550 is below the line of my vision when I look down at the dash, which for me is ideal. To check the GPS I just dip my head a few more cm’s to take in the map info. I don’t intend to use any Bluetooth audio connection so it’s all visual for me.

Fig 11 – Shows the front view of the GPS power connection fitted to the bracket in the lower position.

Fig 12 – Fitting the PP GPS mount means removing all 4 bolts holding the bar in place and replacing them with the longer ones supplied with the bracket. If you’re working solo I recommend leaving some bolts in place and doing the changeover progressively or marking your bar position as it will move as soon as the bolts are loose.

Fig 13 – With everything now in place just connect the lead from your ACC2 to the 550’s power cable and you’re on the home straight!

Fig 14 – Turn on the ignition, watch the device light up and start planning all those twisty, car-less, back road adventures!

Fig 15 – Turn the ignition off and bask in the warm glow of your electrical prowess, safe in the knowledge that your battery is protected from any GPS unplanned use.

Fig 16 – Lastly, I tucked the excess wiring into the black hole of connections that seems to exist in toward the underside of the fuel tank and fixed it to some existing looms. I will do this more permanently once I’m certain this is the best location.

That’s it. Hopefully, you find this guide useful and if I can answer any questions from my limited knowledge base or you have any suggestions re this guide (be nice!) feel free to reach out.

Reference URL’s

Heavy Duty Wire Stripper / Cutter / Crimper with Wire Guide | Jaycar Electronics

TomTom Rider 550 Motorcycle GPS

Economy Autorange Multimeter with Non-Contact Voltage Sensor | Jaycar Electronics

http://www.ktmonlineparts.com.au/part/ktm/64112992033#content

Male Spade - Red - Pk.8 | Jaycar Electronics

Heatshrink Tubing with Glue Lining 4:1 - 8.0mm | Jaycar Electronics
 

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Discussion Starter #2
TomTom Rider 550 GPS connections and mounting Part 2

Fig 10 – shows the PP GPs bracket with the 550’s power connection already mounted (using the 4 screws and washers provided by TomTom). You’ll note that you can position the unit higher or lower on the mount depending on where you place the screws. Lower worked better for me in terms of the position of the GPS. You can test this by just sitting on the bike and holding the bracket in position with the GPS fitted before actually attaching.

In this position when I’m riding the 550 is below the line of my vision when I look down at the dash, which for me is ideal. To check the GPS I just dip my head a few more cm’s to take in the map info. I don’t intend to use any Bluetooth audio connection so it’s all visual for me.

Fig 11 – Shows the front view of the GPS power connection fitted to the bracket in the lower position.

Fig 12 – Fitting the PP GPS mount means removing all 4 bolts holding the bar in place and replacing them with the longer ones supplied with the bracket. If you’re working solo I recommend leaving some bolts in place and doing the changeover progressively or marking your bar position as it will move as soon as the bolts are loose.

Fig 13 – With everything now in place just connect the lead from your ACC2 to the 550’s power cable and you’re on the home straight!

Fig 14 – Turn on the ignition, watch the device light up and start planning all those twisty, car-less, back road adventures!

Fig 15 – Turn the ignition off and bask in the warm glow of your electrical prowess, safe in the knowledge that your battery is protected from any GPS unplanned use.

Fig 16 – Lastly, I tucked the excess wiring into the black hole of connections that seems to exist in toward the underside of the fuel tank and fixed it to some existing looms. I will do this more permanently once I’m certain this is the best location.

That’s it. Hopefully, you find this guide useful and if I can answer any questions from my limited knowledge base or you have any suggestions re this guide (be nice!) feel free to reach out.

Fig 9 _ Ignition Test Off.jpg Fig 10 _ PP GPS bracket from rear..jpg Fig 11 _ PP GPS bracket front view.jpg Fig 12 _ Bolt removal placeholder.jpg Fig 13 _ Mounted.jpg Fig 14 _ Rider 550 ON.jpg Fig 15 _ Rider 550 shut down via ignition.jpg Fig 16 _ Wiring.jpg
 

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Exellent write-up @fork12 - good use of photos too. Particularly like that you show the position of the ACC1/2 connectors behind the headlight light shroud in their default buried state toward the top left (as you look from the front). You need to dig them out a bit to get at them - I'm sure this will help others.

It is quite tightly packed behind there as I found out when I fitted the heated grips, but there is enough space to loosely coil up an excess wire if you need to.

I used some cable ties to secure the a-bit-too-long wires on the PP heated grip harness - you might be able to stow your excess cable there if you don't fancy cutting your GPS cable shorter and remaking the spade connectors again.
 

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Nice clear writeup - well done!

I have a Garmin Zumo fitted to mine but made up a 'slimline' bracket (out of 1mm steel strip) which is fixed to the handlebar with a 'U' bolt.

As I also have a dashcam (mounted on the side of my screen mounting bracket) there wasn't room to fit the necessary power supply boxes in the headlamp housing so I ran both cables, in some 10mm flexible conduit, behind the fuel tank fairing (left hand side) and back to the battery area. The camera needs a permanent and switched 12v supply so used both ACC1 & 2.

There was just enough room to squeeze both power supply boxes on top of the tool roll in front of the battery......
They certainly don't give any spare room for stuff!!
 
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