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I don’t know if the KTM hotline is a worldwide service, but in the Netherlands if you miss one service at the dealer with a registration on ktm.dealer.net they won’t pick you up if your bike fails. Even when the millage is not reached you need at least one official service per year. Just to bare in mind when you reset the service indication.
thankfully here in the US, the warranty is not blanket voided if one does the service themselves. Best to keep receipts/photos of the service to substantiate that it was done.

I reset the indicator without issue.

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thankfully here in the US, the warranty is not blanket voided if one does the service themselves. Best to keep receipts/photos of the service to substantiate that it was done.

I reset the indicator without issue.

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thanks for your reply and the consumer has good waranty in the US. What I tried to say, but wrote it wrong: in the Netherlands and maybe other countries also, only a KTM dealer has acces to the ktm.dealer.net network to register services. The KTM hotline checks in this network if the bike was serviced at least once every year and within the millage. If so, you are in title for hotline service, if not.....
 

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thanks for your reply and the consumer has good waranty in the US. What I tried to say, but wrote it wrong: in the Netherlands and maybe other countries also, only a KTM dealer has acces to the ktm.dealer.net network to register services. The KTM hotline checks in this network if the bike was serviced at least once every year and within the millage. If so, you are in title for hotline service, if not.....
Understood and thanks for clarifying.
 

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thanks for your reply and the consumer has good waranty in the US. What I tried to say, but wrote it wrong: in the Netherlands and maybe other countries also, only a KTM dealer has acces to the ktm.dealer.net network to register services. The KTM hotline checks in this network if the bike was serviced at least once every year and within the millage. If so, you are in title for hotline service, if not.....
Some legal aspect on automotive warranty in the US, can be seen here: Auto Warranties & Routine Maintenance

Do I have to use the dealer for repairs and maintenance to keep my warranty in effect?
No. An independent mechanic, a retail chain shop, or even you yourself can do routine maintenance and repairs on your vehicle. In fact, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, which is enforced by the FTC, makes it illegal for manufacturers or dealers to claim that your warranty is void or to deny coverage under your warranty simply because someone other than the dealer did the work. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select repair facilities if the repair services are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.

That said, there may be certain situations where a repair may not be covered. For example, if you or your mechanic replaced a belt improperly and your engine is damaged as a result, your manufacturer or dealer may deny responsibility for fixing the engine under the warranty. However, according to the FTC, the manufacturer or dealer must be able to demonstrate that it was the improper belt replacement — rather than some other defect — that caused the damage to your engine. The warranty would still be in effect for other parts of your car.

Will using 'aftermarket' or recycled parts void my warranty?
No. An 'aftermarket' part is a part made by a company other than the vehicle manufacturer or the original equipment manufacturer. A 'recycled' part is a part that was made for and installed in a new vehicle by the manufacturer or the original equipment manufacturer, and later removed from the vehicle and made available for resale or reuse. Simply using an aftermarket or recycled part does not void your warranty. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act makes it illegal for companies to void your warranty or deny coverage under the warranty simply because you used an aftermarket or recycled part. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select parts if those parts are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.

Still, if it turns out that the aftermarket or recycled part was itself defective or wasn't installed correctly, and it causes damage to another part that is covered under the warranty, the manufacturer or dealer has the right to deny coverage for that part and charge you for any repairs. The FTC says the manufacturer or dealer must show that the aftermarket or recycled part caused the need for repairs before denying warranty coverage.
 
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