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'20 890R
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I need to find out what IMU is, and what 7 degrees above horizontal is (presumably at the front wheel and bike's wheelbase relative to where the rear wheel contacts the ground). I definitely don't know what 7 degrees feels like while riding.
IMU = Inertial Measurement Unit

7 degrees is enough lift for cool pictures, but not to **** your pants. But keep in mind that it's 7 degrees from initial state, so going over crests etc can result in higher lift.

If you really keep on the throttle and shift well it's possible to maintain the 7 degrees lift through 1st to 3rd gear with AWM on.

The 890 is actually the most controlable bike to wheelie of the bikes I've owned. Pop it in track mode, turn AWM off, set throttle to sport and prepare to smile from ear to ear. Only on closed roads of course 馃槈
 

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Indeed - front suspension has 5.5 inches (140 mm) travel so with the rear squatting under load the front wheel just lofts above the ground.

The IMU is the Inertial Measurement Unit - a device on the bike that allows it to know linear and rotational acceleration / deceleration.

It's used to provide some of the inputs to be able to implement lean sensitive (cornering) ABS, traction control and launch control.
 

Cry Baby
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I need to find out what IMU is, and what 7 degrees above horizontal is (presumably at the front wheel and bike's wheelbase relative to where the rear wheel contacts the ground). I definitely don't know what 7 degrees feels like while riding.
IMU is Inertial Measurement Unit... a collection of sensors that determines lean angle, acceleration, deceleration, and other aspects of forces acting on the motorcycle.
 

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as for my personal experience the front wheel wont lift off the ground for too long, as soon as it leave contact the system will be quick at putting it back to where it belongs. So 7 degrees is kind of the max it will go but you will not be able to keep it.
 

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Reviving an old thread again!

Are you meant to just let the throttle out quick or sort of progressively? And keep throttle to the max or ease off? Read the manual so figured I was doing it right.

Maybe just takes practice ?
Since this hasn't been answered... You hold the throttle wide open, ease the clutch out and don't let off the throttle at all. The engine will keep the revs at the right point but you have to trust in it which is hard. Also if you dump the clutch from the launch, you could flip it. I believe it is in 4th gear that it is totally off or if you let off the throttle, certain lean angle, brake, etc.

I have been experimenting it works pretty well but really hard for me to fully commit at first. I have also found that a 3k launch while rolling hard on the throttle and smoothly letting out the clutch results in almost as good a launch. I haven't taken it to the track to confirm 100% but based on a little test course I set up with street signs and using video on my phone to get the dash and the road.
 

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790 Duke 2020
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As an old curmudgeon, with an engineering background and ingrained mechanical sympathy, I will never use launch control. The brutal wear-rate and heat generated from the clutch is an anathema to me. Clutch life will be dramatically reduced and the hugely increased oil contamination from the clutch friction materials will be detrimental to the rest of the engine and gearbox. Unnecessary madness in my opinion.
 

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As an old curmudgeon, with an engineering background and ingrained mechanical sympathy, I will never use launch control. The brutal wear-rate and heat generated from the clutch is an anathema to me. Clutch life will be dramatically reduced and the hugely increased oil contamination from the clutch friction materials will be detrimental to the rest of the engine and gearbox. Unnecessary madness in my opinion.
Couldn't agree more! I have the same reaction when I see knobs doing burnouts - the stresses and wear that must be putting on so many components makes me cringe.
 

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I'll play devil's advocate for a moment but first I'll say I don't believe in abusing my bike however we did buy a high performance bike targeted for more intensive riding.

@Oldwisedude - launch control doesn't modulate the clutch, you do. So you can slip your clutch like crazy or go faster, all up to you, just don't dump the clutch. Given how low first gear is, it's engine and road speed are going to sync up pretty quickly. Stock gearing, in first gear at redline is about 50 mph. I doubt that will take more than 1.8 seconds max to reach. Not like on my S1000RR where first is VERY tall. My point being is you can't slip it for long until everything is hooked up in first gear so not a lot of stress on the clutch.

@markjanemhan - again a bit if devils advocate here. A lot might factor into how this is done. When I used to drag race a lot, I would actually use my boots to unweight the rear tire a bit by being under the exhaust. It really reduced my bikes' tendencies to hook up immediately (huge shock loading) and greatly reduced my incidents of wheelies in first gear. I got mostly wheelspin and the tire gradually hooked up. Now if someone is sitting their butt on the seat, revving it up and dumping the clutch, then what a huge shock to the entire drivetrain and they get what they deserve.

I raced for many years from MX, hare scrambles, enduros, drags, road, hill climb, etc. One of the best things I learned is not "use up" my equipment. Racing and riding hard will take enough of a toll on your equipment without abusing the snot out of it. Whenever I using my equipment in a more severe way, or environment, I update my maintenance intervals accordingly. I have way too much money invested in my rides to not take care of them.
 

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Thanks for the reply dude 馃憤馃徎

I'm kinda in the same boat with the old engineer to be honest. It can't be that great for the engine when even the computer limits it to 3 tries then there's that cooling off period before you can try again.

It is a bit of a gimmick to be honest. And like you said, if you hold the revs around 3-4k then let the clutch slip whilst increasing the revs you can actually get a pretty fast manual launch away from the lights anyway. Which to me feels almost as quick
 

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And - I am a-feared. baint be natrul - awl dis witchery.

I'm another old curmudgeon. But I am discovering I have latent tendencies.
 

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As an old curmudgeon, with an engineering background and ingrained mechanical sympathy, I will never use launch control. The brutal wear-rate and heat generated from the clutch is an anathema to me. Clutch life will be dramatically reduced and the hugely increased oil contamination from the clutch friction materials will be detrimental to the rest of the engine and gearbox. Unnecessary madness in my opinion.
Used by design and abuse are different, but i get you.
 
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