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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I didn't see any brake pad instructions on here so I thought I'd do a quick write-up. The typical disclaimers apply: I'm not a professional mechanic, do this at your own risk, etc, etc.

Since brake fluid is nasty stuff, protect your paint before working on the brakes. I like to lay microfiber towels on the paint and then create a bib with a shop towel.

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After the bike's paint is protected, remove the master cylinder cover and suck out some old fluid to give yourself some wiggle room. If you turn the handlebars all the way to the right, it'll level out the bars.

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Remove the caliper lock rings with a pair of pliers
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Using a T25 bit, remove the two caliper pins and then remove the retaining clip.
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Remember the clip's orientation and how it interfaces with the caliper pins

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Remove the brake pads. I pushed on each of the pads to retract the brake piston a little bit.
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Install the new pads. Make sure the pad material is facing the rotor.
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Remount the pins, retaining clip, and lock rings. Torque the pins to 7.4 lb-ft, which is BARELY past snug.

You have two calipers, so repeat all these steps on the other side of the bike.

When that's done, make sure there is some brake fluid in the reservoir; you don't want to suck in air. Give the brakes a few good squeezes to seat the pads. It's probably a good time to bleed the brakes right now, but I just topped off the master cylinder with fresh fluid. Reseat the reservoir cover, wipe down any fluid that leaked out, and screw it down.

We're now Ready to Race. Nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Nice write up. What is the recommendation on disc prep for the new pads?
According to EBC:

Fitting New Disc Pads To Used Brake Discs/Rotors

First of all, there are two different types of brake pad on the world markets which are sintered copper alloy or organic types. The sintered types are of course much harder and take 3-5 times longer to bed in GEOMETRICALLY to any hollow areas or ridges on a worn brake rotor. Organic pads being slightly softer bed in more quickly but also suffer from what is known as “green fade”. Green fade is explained as a heat curing of the brake material which happens over the first heavy heat cycles.

To bed in sintered pads, drive the vehicle carefully allowing extra braking distance for the first 300 miles. Please be aware that brake performance during the bed in period may be significantly less than you have been accustomed to. What you are looking for is to see a 90%+ surface area contact between the pad and the disc or rotor before optimum braking will be achieved.

Once your pads are 90% surface area bedded after the 300-400 miles, on a safe road, use the brakes 10 times in succession stopping your motorcycle from 60mph to 20mph to get the brakes deliberately hot. This is particularly important with the organic versions (aramid fibre types, carbon based pad types and semi-metallic pad types). After this process, the pads should settle down and normal riding and brake performance can be safely achieved.
 
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TachitUp-

Thanks, but I'm not looking for the bedding in process, I'm looking for disc prep. I have had my stock pads on now for about 1,200 miles and not sure what I need to do to the discs themselves. I see everything from nothing to wet sanding, and everything in-between.
 

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TachitUp-

Thanks, but I'm not looking for the bedding in process, I'm looking for disc prep. I have had my stock pads on now for about 1,200 miles and not sure what I need to do to the discs themselves. I see everything from nothing to wet sanding, and everything in-between.

I personally do nothing to them besides a clean, all over with pressure from a microfiber cloth using disc brake cleaner followed by a wash after the bike is fully reassembled
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
TachitUp-

Thanks, but I'm not looking for the bedding in process, I'm looking for disc prep. I have had my stock pads on now for about 1,200 miles and not sure what I need to do to the discs themselves. I see everything from nothing to wet sanding, and everything in-between.
I've also seen a million different ways to prep everything. I went the easy route and just threw them in with zero prep. My rotors have 8k miles on them, but the pads still had plenty of life left and I assume the rotors do too. There is some noise that, strangely, sounds like cicadas, but it's slowly improving.
 

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Interesting...I've never really thought of leaving the calipers mounted while changing out the pads - but, clearly, those are the instructions being provided by KTM themselves (post #2). Seems like it would make it a lot harder to clean the caliper and inspect the pistons, though(?).
 

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Thanks for sharing, TachItUp!!!
 
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Great write up with good pictures.

Has anyone else has issues with the pins stripped the threads out the calipers when removing them? All 4 of my pins were bent. According to my service history they were replaced to SBS at a local dealer recently.

Should these be single use only?
 

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Pins are NOT single use. Should not be bent. Sounds like someone did a job on you bike...
 
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Interesting...I've never really thought of leaving the calipers mounted while changing out the pads - but, clearly, those are the instructions being provided by KTM themselves (post #2). Seems like it would make it a lot harder to clean the caliper and inspect the pistons, though(?).
Im surprised too, as pad swap is a great time to clean the Pistons, make sure nothing is sticking. Plus how do you press the Pistons back with the rotor in there?

fresh scotch brite pad and brake clean is a great way to remove old brake lining deposits from rotor prior to using new pads, also the first thing you should do if you start getting a pulsing brake as an uneven deposit of brake lining material may have been transferred to the rotor causing the effect that many times people consider a warped rotor. Kurveygirl.com shipped a sanding sponge with my racing brake pads they shipped for my zx6r track bike for the same purpose.
 

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Im surprised too, as pad swap is a great time to clean the Pistons, make sure nothing is sticking. Plus how do you press the Pistons back with the rotor in there?

fresh scotch brite pad and brake clean is a great way to remove old brake lining deposits from rotor prior to using new pads, also the first thing you should do if you start getting a pulsing brake as an uneven deposit of brake lining material may have been transferred to the rotor causing the effect that many times people consider a warped rotor. Kurveygirl.com shipped a sanding sponge with my racing brake pads they shipped for my zx6r track bike for the same purpose.
Yea, Kurvey is good like that wt including the sanding sponge.
 
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