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I'm looking for the electrical output of the 790 in Watts for electrical accessories. Tried looking in the owners manual and can't find it.

I want to put about 150 Watts worth of heated gear on, and I need to know if the Duke can handle it.
 

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Hi @Dazed - 150W is quite a lot for heated clothes - will be toasty! I think the alternator can handle it just fine.

If you look in the (2019 model) manual, page 201 the ACC1 and ACC2 fuses are both rated at 10A.

It's a 12V system so as P=IV, each can supply 10*12 = 120W.

I think ACC1 is always on, and ACC2 is ignition switched - you can find both of them under the pillion seat (on the left hand side behind the battery) *and* they are both in the headlamp cowl too. They are presented as clear rubber shielded 6mm female spade sockets so you need 6mm male spade connectors to attach your gear.
 

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Hi @Dazed
If you look in the (2019 model) manual, page 201 the ACC1 and ACC2 fuses are both rated at 10A.
One thing to be aware of is that the fuse for ACC1 serves both the front and rear leads. Same for ACC2. That means you're limited to 10 amps total for each circuit.
 

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The leads aren't labelled either - just two pairs of connectors at either end. You can use a multimeter to figure out which are switched with the ignition and which are always on.

The wiring colours are just about visible (one pair has a red/orange stripe on one of them that's easy to see) - they are the same colours at either end so once you figure out one you know the other.

FYI - my power outlet post is here: https://www.790dukeforum.com/forum/716-790-duke-how/1362-how-add-power-outlets.html
 

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I'm looking for the electrical output of the 790 in Watts for electrical accessories. Tried looking in the owners manual and can't find it.

I want to put about 150 Watts worth of heated gear on, and I need to know if the Duke can handle it.
Hey! I don't think you're going to get a straight answer. Rule of thumb for cars is topically stock accessories consume 40-60% of the alternator's capability. I could see a bike alternator being scaled undersized in comparison because power/weight is so easily affected.

I think your best bet is to put a watt meter on it and go for a ride. See where your at during normal operation. You may have issues with the added gear during long cold rides if the usage now consistently exceeds 60% of the alternators 12v, 400w capability. The battery is only rated at 10Ah, so it won't be able to compensate for very long.

Another fun fact: The ECU is picky. Mine refused to start at 11.6v with no low battery warning..
 

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I have a 2019 model and they labeled the leads in the back. I haven't looked at the ones in the front.
Interesting - mine's a 2019 model too but didn't see any sign of any labelling, only the very ends of the shielded female spade connectors were visible but managed to pull out about an inch of cable.
 

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Hey! I don't think you're going to get a straight answer. Rule of thumb for cars is topically stock accessories consume 40-60% of the alternator's capability. I could see a bike alternator being scaled undersized in comparison because power/weight is so easily affected.

I think your best bet is to put a watt meter on it and go for a ride. See where your at during normal operation. You may have issues with the added gear during long cold rides if the usage now consistently exceeds 60% of the alternators 12v, 400w capability. The battery is only rated at 10Ah, so it won't be able to compensate for very long.

Another fun fact: The ECU is picky. Mine refused to start at 11.6v with no low battery warning..
Good call @CATMAN - I think 150W *is* high, but it may be possible, 100W from either of ACC1 or ACC2 should be possible.

The bike has all LED lighting so much lower draw than standard 50/60W headlight drain from incandescent bulbs - probably less than 20W for all the lights.

On other bikes I've owned running draw was about 50W to run the ECU and running lights, but the 790 has other electrical bits like the quick shifter, IMU and fancy ABS.
@Dazed - what makes up the 150W you need - heated grips, gloves, jacket?
 

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Good call @CATMAN - I think 150W *is* high, but it may be possible, 100W from either of ACC1 or ACC2 should be possible.

The bike has all LED lighting so much lower draw than standard 50/60W headlight drain from incandescent bulbs - probably less than 20W for all the lights.

On other bikes I've owned running draw was about 50W to run the ECU and running lights, but the 790 has other electrical bits like the quick shifter, IMU and fancy ABS.
That all seems to be good RoT values. I'd say they're a bit low ball but OK.

I have not measured but I'd spec the KTM headlight at over 20W - It'll be close to that on DIP or DRL - But will be higher on FULL beam. Twice at least. Tail light will be about 1W tail 3W brake. It's pretty much an industry standard. I have done a lot of LED lighting work in the past - And the 790 light is strong. Shame it's not adaptive, but........

A draw on all FI bikes is the fuel pump (all motors are electricity drinkers) ECU and coils. Thing to remember is that most modern alternators are almost at full power well down the rpm range - but draw from pumps/coils etc rise with rpms and load. I would personally ALWAYS leave a good 10% of alternator capacity free.
 
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