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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m a new 2020 Duke 790 owner. Came over to KTM after owning BMW bikes for about 20 years. All BMW bikes burn oil. Some more than others and some less than others, but they all burn some amount.
On long rides I always packed a quart of oil.
Does the same hold true for the 790?
 

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Not a drop of oil but neither did my S1000R or my current R1200GS.... Not sure where you are getting "all BMW bikes burn oil" from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not a drop of oil but neither did my S1000R or my current R1200GS.... Not sure where you are getting "all BMW bikes burn oil" from.
I will be a bit more polite than you were in your response.
As a 12 year member of the MOA and an owner of 7 BMW models, air heads, water cooled, and both brick and slant 4’s each and every one of them along with countless dozens of Beemers that I have met and rode with at rallies ALL burned some oil. It is just a fact.
So I had a simple question regarding potential oil consumption in the KTM.
A simple answer regarding your Zktm would have sufficed.
Clearly you are lucky to have bikes that do not burn a single drop of oil, therefore I congratulate you.
Ride on my friend.
 

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I will be a bit more polite than you were in your response.
As a 12 year member of the MOA and an owner of 7 BMW models, air heads, water cooled, and both brick and slant 4’s each and every one of them along with countless dozens of Beemers that I have met and rode with at rallies ALL burned some oil. It is just a fact.
So I had a simple question regarding potential oil consumption in the KTM.
A simple answer regarding your Zktm would have sufficed.
Clearly you are lucky to have bikes that do not burn a single drop of oil, therefore I congratulate you.
Ride on my friend.
No luck involved, no one I know (and I know many) with a modern BMW bike has an issue with their bike burning oil. Certainly not in the several FB pages and forums that I administrator anyway.

Your claim that "all BMW bike burn" oil is completely false. When you make claims like yours then you can expect a response, especially when they are wrong.
 

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Same here 2013 Bmw GS, 2010 Aprilia Tuono V2, 2019 Ktm 790 ,none burn any measurable oil.
 

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In my experience, albeit rebuilding old British engines, oil burning was more likely if you ran-in the engine too gently from brand new.

I think the best way, although it sounds counter-intuitive at first, is to keep varying the throttle openings from at least half open to closed. Repeat this every few seconds during the first 20 mile ride following a rebuild (or new bike). The open-throttle period keeps the piston rings pressed firmly against the bores, the closed throttle period cools to prevent hot spots.

Modern factory-built engines can (and should) be ridden quite hard straight from the box using the above 'intermittent method', without incurring any damage whatsoever. Quite the reverse. The engine will bed-in better than cruising along gently for 1000 miles. No need to wring its neck. Just keep intermittently pressing those piston rings on to the bores - only achievable when significant throttle is applied. The relatively short period when some honing marks still exist in the bores and the rings are virgin is probably only during the first 20 miles or so don't miss this critical narrow window. Clearly any engine continues to free up and get better and more powerful as the mileage increases. But those first few miles are the most influential, particularly regarding oil burning and achieving full power.

I appreciate why the manufacturer's running-in method is different - they cannot risk the potential dangers of throttle on/throttle off causing instability or confusion to other traffic. So for most of the time, keeping the revs below 6k on lightish throttles will suffice. However, I bet that factory race teams run them in like they stole them!

I suspect that many oil burning engines were simply run-in much too gently. Subsequently the piston rings have never fully married to the bores, with resultant ring blow-by and oil loss. Just my two-pennoth.

p.s. My 790 Duke does not burn any oil whatsoever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
In my experience, albeit rebuilding old British engines, oil burning was more likely if you ran-in the engine too gently from brand new.

I think the best way, although it sounds counter-intuitive at first, is to keep varying the throttle openings from at least half open to closed. Repeat this every few seconds during the first 20 mile ride following a rebuild (or new bike). The open-throttle period keeps the piston rings pressed firmly against the bores, the closed throttle period cools to prevent hot spots.

Modern factory-built engines can (and should) be ridden quite hard straight from the box using the above 'intermittent method', without incurring any damage whatsoever. Quite the reverse. The engine will bed-in better than cruising along gently for 1000 miles. No need to wring its neck. Just keep intermittently pressing those piston rings on to the bores - only achievable when significant throttle is applied. The relatively short period when some honing marks still exist in the bores and the rings are virgin is probably only during the first 20 miles or so don't miss this critical narrow window. Clearly any engine continues to free up and get better and more powerful as the mileage increases. But those first few miles are the most influential, particularly regarding oil burning and achieving full power.

I appreciate why the manufacturer's running-in method is different - they cannot risk the potential dangers of throttle on/throttle off causing instability or confusion to other traffic. So for most of the time, keeping the revs below 6k on lightish throttles will suffice. However, I bet that factory race teams run them in like they stole them!

I suspect that many oil burning engines were simply run-in much too gently. Subsequently the piston rings have never fully married to the bores, with resultant ring blow-by and oil loss. Just my two-pennoth.

p.s. My 790 Duke does not burn any oil whatsoever.
Thank you very much for your no nonsense informative and gentlemen’s you reply.
 

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Modern factory-built engines can (and should) be ridden quite hard straight from the box using the above 'intermittent method', without incurring any damage whatsoever.
My last 3 new bikes have been broken in precisely as you describe, with very particular attention to the first few miles of their lives, ensuring very variable throttle input, and a ton of up and down gear shifting. No issues whatsoever with oil consumption, and the transmission on the 790 particularly is smooth as silk. (I generally shift using the clutch.) It's at around 20,000 kms now, and I was only thinking yesterday whilst on a ride, how good the engine is feeling. Pulls great and seems to almost be improving with use!
 

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Not sure I've owned any bike that actually burnt oil - but I've had one or two that would breathe (more like spit) massive amounts of oil mist into the filter box and whence through the inlet valves.
 

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Not sure I've owned any bike that actually burnt oil - but I've had one or two that would breathe (more like spit) massive amounts of oil mist into the filter box and whence through the inlet valves.
I've had two bikes that have burn a small amount of oil, a Honda and an Aprilia. I would never say all Hondas and Aprilias burn oil though....lol

The Aprilia dumped oil in the airbox as you mentioned.
 

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The Aprilia dumped oil in the airbox as you mentioned.
Though I have not owned one - There was an early version of the Guzzi V7 that really suffered.
Not uncommon to find the Air filter actually sitting in an oil bath. Seen loads at my mates Guzzi WorkShop.
 

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Mine does not seem to be missing any between oil changes, so I guess it is a no.
 

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Bikes tend to burn more oil when driven hard (which is normal), so that has to be taken into account. Also important to state is your oil change interval; you can expect more oil burned if you change the oil every 7K miles, than every 3K. I ride mostly in a gentle manner, and change the oil on my bikes around 3K miles, since that's what I ride them in a year, and I always do a yearly oil change, regardless of miles. I've never noticed any oil consumption under those conditions, including my many BMWs... BUT it's a very short OCI, and not abusing them.
 

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my 790 burned like about 200ml of oil in 2500km/1500miles but i rode it quite hard, despite always warming it up properly. Really was surprised by it.
 

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I’m a new 2020 Duke 790 owner. Came over to KTM after owning BMW bikes for about 20 years. All BMW bikes burn oil. Some more than others and some less than others, but they all burn some amount.
On long rides I always packed a quart of oil.
Does the same hold true for the 790?
Hiya. I have had 5 BM's from new and oil use has not been much of an issue. Odd puff of smoke if on side stand and left idle a week or two.
My KTM 790 does use a bit.
Mind you, I bought it ex demo with 3800 miles on the clock. I probably put a bit in every 1000 miles or so - the trouble is, it is so hard to read, that I usually end up having to drain a bit out....
In hear what people say about running in, but it is generally pretty anecdotal. I tend to observe rev limits on breaking in, but will use reasonably open throttle and plenty of over run cycles - get to change the gears and everything :cool:
I did know a rally driver back in the day who was a mechanic by trade. He said he just observed the rev limit and was happy to give it WOT - I guess I took it on, coz lets face it, fannying about on SFA throttle for a thousand miles is tedious. In an ideal world, I would rather purchase a bike with the engine came already run in.
 

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Hiya. I have had 5 BM's from new and oil use has not been much of an issue. Odd puff of smoke if on side stand and left idle a week or two.
My KTM 790 does use a bit.
Mind you, I bought it ex demo with 3800 miles on the clock. I probably put a bit in every 1000 miles or so - the trouble is, it is so hard to read, that I usually end up having to drain a bit out....
In hear what people say about running in, but it is generally pretty anecdotal. I tend to observe rev limits on breaking in, but will use reasonably open throttle and plenty of over run cycles - get to change the gears and everything :cool:
I did know a rally driver back in the day who was a mechanic by trade. He said he just observed the rev limit and was happy to give it WOT - I guess I took it on, coz lets face it, fannying about on SFA throttle for a thousand miles is tedious. In an ideal world, I would rather purchase a bike with the engine came already run in.
If it's white smoke that goes away soon after then its most likely condensation in the exhaust.
 

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If it's white smoke that goes away soon after then its most likely condensation in the exhaust.
It don't smell like condensation ;-)
I'd say consumption on my last couple of boxers is about 500 ml every 6000 miles, so really not an issue for me.
 

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It don't smell like condensation ;-)
I'd say consumption on my last couple of boxers is about 500 ml every 6000 miles, so really not an issue for me.
haha fair enough! My LC boxer hasn't used a drop in 6 years I've owned it so far.
 
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