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Discussion Starter #1
Questions for those of you who do it.

1. How much do heated grips help with keeping your whole hand warm? Do they work well with regular gloves (summer or all season) or are they more geared to winter gloves with a bit of heat to "help?"

2. Do hand guards help with the cold on your hands by keeping the wind off them or are they more only for protection?

3. What jackets & gloves do you guys use for colder weather riding?


I would like to continue riding into the colder season and looking at some options to help my shivers on my commute.
 

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I had Oxford heated grips and hand guards on my WR250R. I rode that bike down to 18 degrees last winter. IMO, the grips are good for chilly nights and work well with regular gloves but if you wanted to ride COLD weather, get heated gloves as they will heat the whole hand instead of just the palm. The thing with grips is that it really depends on how thick the gloves are. The guards helped keep the heat from getting blasted away but I'd say if you had heated gloves, you could skip the guards.

I'd say for chilly fall days, grips and regular gloves work well. If you want to ride deeper into winter, say under 50 degrees, go for a nice pair of heated gloves. The guards help but made the least difference.
 

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I had heated grips on my Blackbird. They were ok but the tips of my fingers till suffered below freezing. On my Street Triple, I didn't have heated grips but had Acerbis guards and winter gloves with silk liners. I got cold hands and was uncomfortable but it was bearable on 2+hour trips thanks to the guards. On my GSX-S 1000 naked, I switched to Gerbing heated gloves with a controller drawing power from the battery - problem totally solved. With warm hands all over, the rest of me was warm. I've continued that approach with the Duke 790. For me, these were the game changers for riding in frosty conditions.

I use an Oxford cordura jacket for winter riding and layer up under that with Icebreaker merino depending on how cold it is. I also have a Rukka Outlast base layer which is supposedly good for both hot and cold environments. Seems to work just fine. Also got a Spidi lightweight hi-viz waterproof shell to use as a windbreaker or in super-wet conditions to go over my Oxford jacket. I also have Rev'it Gore-Tex trousers with a removable padded liner. I also use Oxford motorcycle stretch leggings underneath in all weathers because they're comfortable.

Hope that helps to give perspective.

Oh, and it's my 72nd birthday tomorrow and my darling wife has bought me a Rev'it Tornado 2 mesh jacket for warmer weather riding :kiss:. it has a detachable waterproof lining which can be used as a casual "bomber" style jacket. Handy for being on tour and travelling light!
 

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Ride year round through winter

1. Heated grips are a bare minimum for me personally, however my commute is only 10 miles each way though city traffic, if I had any motorway miles I would use my heated gloves. The reason I don’t use them for my usual journey is that I find I lose a lot of dexterity with Gerbing’s, very nearly had an accident using them fumbling over a brake, although it was probably more due to my incompetence than fault of the gloves.

2. Guards will shield to a degree, however if you want better protection muffs would be more suitable. Most couriers in London use a combination of heated grips and muffs, this allows them to use very light summer gloves, or even no gloves at all, allowing them quick access to their mobiles etc. I don’t know if I could bring myself to install these though as they are extremely unsightly :grin: my work colleague has a pair on his Hornet that he absolutely swears by.

3. I use the same gear year round and just use layers to increase warmth or shield the elements. My daily gear is single layer rokker jeans, if it’s raining I have a pair of old army gore-tex pullover trousers and if it’s cold I have a pair of merino leggings. Jacket is klim gore-tex and if it’s cold either just a jumper underneath or really cold will add a merino long sleeve vest.

Again, this is all for city miles, if I was doing considerable distance including motorway, I would use the heated gloves and also probably invest in a heated jacket, I’d probably also buy a GS for it lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Awesome guys!! Thanks!!



My commute is about 40 mins, 30 mi. About half of it is at highway speeds, the other half about 50 mph. I also leave at 5am, so it's still dark and mostly the chilliest time. Unfortunately, in the afternoon, the weather is much warmer and I am stripping all my layers.



I usually have ridden in when above 50 degrees F. I wear a pair of jeans and a button down shirt most days, so I layer up under my jacket. Jacket is a textile (with removable insulation layer) and does well against the cold. Top of my body is usually pretty good, but I can see in colder weather (35-50 deg f) i'd get cold. The screen helps with that. My hands have been really the only thing that gets real cold for that distance and temp. I was thinking about the heated gloves, but was wondering about dexterity. I may have to invest in a pair. If the grips really only keep your palms warm, then I may just pass on those. I don't plan on riding below freezing to be honest, nor in the rain. It would be nice to get through those mornings that are above freezing, and perfect in the afternoons.



Welcoming any more comments....including your choices of heated gloves, grips, and shields. Don't Owl, I would never disgrace the bike with muffs! Those are for mopeds and scooters! LMAO!!
 

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For any distance in winter you need to shield from wind and water. Sleet is about as bad as it can get - except maybe hail.
I have muffs on the R3 because - simply - it was being used when I could not say "I'll take the car today".

I've just put some "Chinese copies of the Acerbis Dual Road" on the 790. Useless!. Next will be Powerbronze I think. I don't like how the Puig ones fit. If they don't work - Barkbuster BBZ over the chinese thingies.

I set my limit at the BBZ. I know HippoHands are the DogzBollix but I like to see the switchgear.
 

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I’d say at least 75% of couriers here (87.23% of statistics are made up on the spot) have them on their bikes in winter, most of them riding mid capacity 600cc bikes.

If you ride for a living especially in winter the last thing you care about is how “cool” you look :grin: they use them because it works.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I don't ride through the winter and have the option to drive or ride, so muffs are not even on the docket. I do completely understand the reason and need for them, and for a job like that or a choice....so be it. They are not my cup of tea!
 

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I don't ride through the winter and have the option to drive or ride, so muffs are not even on the docket. I do completely understand the reason and need for them, and for a job like that or a choice....so be it. They are not my cup of tea!
Nor mine, if I’m not taking the bike my options to get to work are

£11.50 congestion charge +
£12.50 ulez charge +
~£30 for parking a day (if you’re lucky)

so ~£55 (~$70) a day for the privilege of driving into London.

Or £8 (~$10) to get the tube/public transport, thank goodness I have the option to work from home or else I’d be paying the higher charges to avoid that cesspit :grin: lol

Might get a set of those powerbronze handguards though, they’re on special at the moment.
 

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In bad weather I take the car with a lot of heating and good music.
If the sun shows I take the bike whatever the temperature, but only to go to work, about 15 minutes.

I ride the winter like in summer but with a good winter glove (I don't like long) and a warm underwear + neck cover. Arriving at work I stickmyself on a radiator for 10 minutes :devil:


An icelandese said that it's very good for health :grin:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Nor mine, if I’m not taking the bike my options to get to work are

£11.50 congestion charge +
£12.50 ulez charge +
~£30 for parking a day (if you’re lucky)

so ~£55 (~$70) a day for the privilege of driving into London.

Or £8 (~$10) to get the tube/public transport, thank goodness I have the option to work from home or else I’d be paying the higher charges to avoid that cesspit :grin: lol

Might get a set of those powerbronze handguards though, they’re on special at the moment.
HOLY CRAP!!!! :surprise::surprise::surprise::sad:

Remind me never to come visit!!! Good Lord!!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Keep in mind I'm married............so take that for what it is....or isn't!
 

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Nor mine, if I’m not taking the bike my options to get to work are

£11.50 congestion charge +
£12.50 ulez charge +
~£30 for parking a day (if you’re lucky)

so ~£55 (~$70) a day for the privilege of driving into London.

Or £8 (~$10) to get the tube/public transport, thank goodness I have the option to work from home or else I’d be paying the higher charges to avoid that cesspit :grin: lol

Might get a set of those powerbronze handguards though, they’re on special at the moment.
I recently heard some bit about no passenger vehicles allowed in parts of New York City, (during peak hours?), I didn't really pay much attention to it, as I don't work there nor do I usually go in during the week. Sunday is the quietest day in NYC.
Some wacky fees as well, but most can be avoided depending on route, thankfully. That sounds crazy in London though!
 

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I recently heard some bit about no passenger vehicles allowed in parts of New York City, (during peak hours?), I didn't really pay much attention to it, as I don't work there nor do I usually go in during the week. Sunday is the quietest day in NYC.
Some wacky fees as well, but most can be avoided depending on route, thankfully. That sounds crazy in London though!
Parts of Madrid are now only accessible if the vehicle has Electric or LPG propulsion (Hibrids too). The rest is subject to air contamination levels on the day and the Euro level of the vehicle. Thankfully I don't need to go in often. The missus does daily - but she works for the city and gets free public transport.
 

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For any distance in winter you need to shield from wind and water. Sleet is about as bad as it can get - except maybe hail.
And then today I awoke to, and was reminded of, what may be the ABSOLUTE worst for hands, visors, gentleman's vegetables et al :- FOG. Or low cloud. Good lord! - it chills.
 
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