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Has anyone fitted a chain oiler to their Duke yet?
I'm thinking Scottoiler, Tutoro, Loobman etc.
 

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Has anyone fitted a chain oiler to their Duke yet?
I'm thinking Scottoiler, Tutoro, Loobman etc.
I had a Scottoiler on my Blackbird and the chain and sprockets were still in great condition at 60,000 km. They work really well but the one thing that annoyed me was no matter how low I set the flow, there was always some fling onto the rear of the bike. Even worse was the gunge that slowly built up in the front sprocket housing. Maybe I could have got away with even less flow. Since then on all my bikes, I've stuck with teflon-based chain waxes. No fling and they seem as effective as oilers if applied regularly. I've used Maxima or Tirox for several years.
 

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I did have a Scotoiler on my SMT which I adapted to feed oil nearer the front sprocket and it worked well, never had any issues with it. Problem is where to fit one on the 790. Space is tight to say the least.
 

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I never used one of these oilers, but I've noticed that people from Europe (and other places), used them regularly.

Personally, I just make a habit to check tire pressure, and lube the chain every 1000 miles.

I suppose the region you live in, could play a part in needing more frequent lube.
 

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I did have a Scotoiler on my SMT which I adapted to feed oil nearer the front sprocket and it worked well, never had any issues with it. Problem is where to fit one on the 790. Space is tight to say the least.

Can you elaborate a little or even provide photos? In my stupidity, because I had one in my old bike and didn't wanted to dismental it, I have purchased a new one (before receiving the bike) and I'm wrapping my head around were and even if to put it. The KTM throws dirt on my lower left boot when it is wet and I don't want to add oil to the mix.
 

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I never used one of these oilers, but I've noticed that people from Europe (and other places), used them regularly.

Personally, I just make a habit to check tire pressure, and lube the chain every 1000 miles.

I suppose the region you live in, could play a part in needing more frequent lube.
J D I agree with you, guess depends on road conditions. I see no need for one where I live and ride. Not even sure how they fit bit lots of space near starter under intake area
 

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I fitted a Tutoro to my Honda VFR, since it was awkward to access the chain and I wasn’t strong enough to get the bike onto its centre stand, to spin the rear wheel and lube the chain. The Tutoro worked brilliantly and was far easier to instal than the Nemo or Scott. The concept is ingenious, easy to control oil flow and very effective but without complexity or the mess of Loobman.
I can easily lift the Duke using a rear paddock stand and so I oil the chain after most rides. If I had to do touring trips I would fit a Tutoro again. Nick Ibbitsen, owner and designer of the Tutoro system, is very helpful and innovative in devising fitting methods. Strongly recommended.
 

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I never used one of these oilers, but I've noticed that people from Europe (and other places), used them regularly.
Most of the folk I know using one do lots of all weather mileage. But chain lubing on commuter bikes was one reason I moved to shaft drive for decades.

UK riders may remember a company (in the 80's) that made chain enclosures after Yamaha fitted one as standard on the TR1. You ran a tiny oil bath. Chains lasted way longer.
 

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I've used a lot of them. I like the simplicity of the TUTORO but I found a better option with the Cobbra Nemo 2. I have it on 5 other bikes. Now that it is cooler, I'll have a chance to fit it on my 890.
 

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Cobbra Nemo 2 is well made but you need handlebar space plus a route from there to the chain. It is manually operated but durable.

Tutoro is fully automatic but simple. Turns itself on when you start riding and off when you stop, continually lubricating.

Scott seems very complex to me, requiring lengthy installation procedure. Pricey too.

You pays your money.......etc.

Shaft drive is my personal preference but, other than my old Guzzi V50, most shafties are over 240kg and beyond my ability to manhandle when stationary.
 

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Shaft drive is my personal preference but, other than my old Guzzi V50, most shafties are over 240kg and beyond my ability to manhandle when stationary.
Honestly I don't know what my old Guzzi V1000G5 weighs. The Rocket-iII is bleedin' 'eavy - and it's a blighter on slippy ferry decks.

I can't see why the Nemo could not be mounted somewhere else, like - say - engine bars. 1/4 turn at each tank of fuel.
I had a very early Scott-Oiler on my Laverda Montjuic back in the mid 80's. They seem to have increased in price ahelluvlot.
 

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The 500cc shaftie v-twin Guzzi V50 weighed around 350lb (160kg) dry. Delightfully instinctive handling, as per 790 Duke. Sadly its 48 bhp feels outgunned in today's traffic. Wonderful little bike in its day, though.
 

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The 500cc shaftie v-twin Guzzi V50 weighed around 350lb (160kg) dry. Delightfully instinctive handling, as per 790 Duke. Sadly its 48 bhp feels outgunned in today's traffic. Wonderful little bike in its day, though.
I think I have probably ridden every model of Guzzi made.

I lived really close to Three Cross Motorcycles at one time and would get called to help run in the odd one. The 4 valve head V50 was a stunning little engine. I have had at least one large-block Guzzi in the garage since 1979.

If you want a NIMBLE Guzzi - Look for a good used Bellagio. Only sold en Europe - Revvy 900cc in a sports chassis - but it looks like a custom. I keep threatening the missus with one. Every time I have ridden one - I come back smiling. Maybe when I sell the Rocket-III.

Here in Spain one of my oldest friends runs a Guzzi workshop. COVID has prevented me going in to help out most weeks.
 
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